‘such people’ from The Tempest classes

‘Such People – Poems after The Tempest’
Tuesday, 2nd June 2015 at 7:30pm
Taking place at: The Betsey Trotwood, 56 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3BL
Around twenty poets read new poems inspired by the famous play. Poets ( Kate was one of them) from Roddy Lumsden’s Poetry School course on the text are joined by others. Held on the faraway island known as The Betsey. £5, starts about 7.30pm. 

Reading at the Shuffle

Invited by Kathryn Maris, guest arranger, Kate reads with Simon Barraclough, Anthony Howell and others at The Shuffle on 30 May 2015. This is held at 7.30pm on the last Saturday of the month at Poetry Cafe , 22 Betterton Street, London WC2H 9BX, in the cellar which is small and can get packed and very hot – arrive in good time and have a drink in the cafe above.

Dulwich Festival 12 May in conversation

On Tuesday 12 May at 7.30pm in The Old Library Dulwich College, Kate will be talking about attentiveness in poetry with Rupert Christiansen, opera critic and writer, discussing poems they have together selected and what it takes to make a poem. Plus she will be reading from The Observances. Copies on sale from Rye Books.

The Place for Poetry, Goldsmiths 8 May

Goldsmiths Writers Centre is hosting a two-day conference on the place for poetry with Paul Muldoon, Blake Morrison, Maura Dooley, Emily Berry and – along with a number of other Americans – Dan O’Brien, latest Aldeburgh First Collection winner, among its keynote speakers and readers.

On Friday 8 May, 2015 Kate will read from The Observances at 1.15, joined by N.J. Hynes and Rebecca Farmer, recent fellow alumnae of Goldsmiths.

Greenwich peninsula, launch of The Observances

DSC01739This stretch of water and land reclaimed from a vast gasworks for housing/schools beyond the O2 dome was backdrop to the successful launch of The Observances on 16 April 2015. As one guest of the evening noted in his blog, the tide was flowing fast between the clanking barges that carry containers full of London’s litter away down the Thames (while literature drifts the other way, we hope, into the city, bookshops!, memory).

 

DSCN4649

Two poems at dawn

Shearsman 103 & 104 ( Summer 2015) publishes two poems charting the work of artists whose day begins at first light: Reach – Monet in his boat on the Epte, assisted by his daughter in law, Blanche Hoschédé, and A Bird does not sing because it has an answer – an artist working with sound recording in a forest in Kent.

 

Beachcombing at Bermondsey

 

It’s not every day the river

offers up a bucket but here’s a pail,

pale blue. For an hour we fill it

with the river’s clutter, handles, pipes,

blue and white china, tumbled

glass, a cap badge.

 

Loaded, and we stink of mud, we turn to go

back along the beach but the beach has gone.

 

The tide’s sneaked up behind a bend

close by us, slip-slapping on the river-wall.

 

It snaps at your red boots,

and since you are a metre tall,

its hunger makes me also feel small, endangered,

startled as an animal, driven to scale

the weed-hung wall.

 

You swing yourself over the parapet

and pointing to the bucket in displeasure,

chatter like a marmoset. I have it, yes,

but to follow you and bring it too

I’ve jettisoned the best

part of your treasure.

 

Forthcoming events

image2

Kate will be appearing with Kayo Chingonyi and Gale Burns at the eco-fiesta for Sydenham Word Fair which suits her open-air subject matter …  at Sydenham Garden on 9 March 2015 http://www.sydenhamarts.co.uk/event/a-special-green-fiesta/

and on 12 May in conversation with the opera critic and writer Rupert Christiansen for the Dulwich Festival. They will talk about the attentiveness required of a writer and read some favourite poems at Dulwich College Library. Tickets from the Dulwich Festival website www.dulwichfestival.co.uk/

Longest Day

Published in the Times Literary Supplement on 12 February, this is one of three poems from The Observances to catch the light of day just before the book is out.

The Rialto 82, due early Spring 2015, will include ‘Every Book is a Long Walk’ under the influence of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks.

Against This Light

This poem appears in the forthcoming issue of Ambit, January 2015.

It is based on a tiny self-portrait by Leon Cogniet, newly arrived at the Villa Medici in Rome on a scholarship, reading the first letter from home. The painting is in Cleveland Museum of Art and can be found if you google.  Cogniet later became director of the Ecole de Beaux Arts, the most prestigious French art school, and encouraged his sister Marie Amelie to head a teaching studio where women might also train as figurative artists, learning to draw from the life model as men were allowed to do.